What Is the Legal and USCIS Fee When Applying For L Visa?

What Is the Legal and USCIS Fee When Applying For L Visa

Before you go about applying for an L visa, you need to know what you are getting yourself into in the first place. Most importantly you need to find out more about the legal fees that need to be paid while applying for an L visa. It goes without saying that travelling to another country requires extensive planning. The last thing you will ever want is to be over budget and being unable to cover your expenses during your stay in the U.S.  That being said, here is everything you need to know about the Legal and USCIS fee while applying for an L visa.

Classifications for L-1A and L-1B Visa

If you are planning to apply for the visa through premium processing, the total fee will amount to $1550 out of which $325 needs to be paid by personal or corporate check to the Department of Homeland Security. Furthermore, the remaining $1225 needs to be paid to the Department of Homeland Security via a separate check. For all L-1 initial petitions, change of status and transfer from one employer to another, $500 will be paid in the form of Fraud Prevention and Detection fees.

Classifications for Blanket L-1

For the Blanket L-1 application, the fee schedule is as follows:

  • $325 while filing the initial petition to the USCIS
  • $500 as fee for Fraud Prevention and Detection
  • In case the petition is being filed through premium processing then $1225 plus an additional $2200 will need to be paid as legal fees.

Request for Evidence

In case a USCIS adjudicator is unable to determine whether a specific fee applies in the first place, an RFE (Request for Evidence) will be issued to the petitioner. The RFE will ask the petitioner for any fees that he/she might have missed out on or for supporting evidence that indicates that the a particular fee does not apply.

The idea here is to clarify any discrepancies, which could have taken place and to rectify any issue, which could cause a lot of problems later on. In case the information provided in response to the RFE is insufficient then a notice of intent to deny may be issued. Moreover, you have to keep in mind that a petitioner will not be approved if the evidence provided is subject to additional fees, but he/she fails to submit it along with the response.

It is important for you to make sure you go through each and every detail before applying for the L visa. Failure to do so not only cause unnecessary delays, but can also risk being denied entry into the U.S. But then again, once you know how much needs to be paid to the USCIS and in the form of legal fees, you will be able to determine whether such a trip is feasible and whether you will be able to finance your trip to and from the U.S. all the while covering the necessary expenditures during your stay.

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