What To Do After You Got E-2 Investor Visa?

What to do after you got your E-2 Visa?

After the long process of getting your visa, packing, saying goodbye to your family and friends and relocating to America, it may seem like the hardest part is over. Well, in some ways yes, but in other ways, no. While you probably made great preparations for yourself and your family to adjust to your new life (especially after reading the previous blog post, Understanding Your Family’s Needs When Moving to the U.S.), there are still further adjustments that are needed now that you have officially moved to the U.S.

Get familiar with your city.

One of the first major adjustments to make when you have officially moved to the U.S. is getting familiar with your new city. With over 50 states to choose from, each being distinctively different in size, location, climate, culture, etc., it is imperative that you take the time to learn about your state and city, and maybe even the surrounding states. For example, the weather in Miami, Florida mid-December is completely different and way hotter, than the weather in Boston, Massachusetts, during the same time period. Understanding this small bit of information just may save you from coming to Florida with your snow boots and wooly sweaters.

Get a driving license.

The weather is not the only thing that you may need time adjusting to. Transportation is vastly different in different parts of the country. Although we all drive on the right side of the road in America (well… most of us), the decision to own a vehicle or not own a vehicle depends on where you live. Another point to consider is obtaining a drivers license for the state in which you live. Each state has a division of driver’s license office than can be found online at http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Motor-Vehicles.shtml . Please review the requirements for the state in which you live because the requirements and fees may be different for each state. Even if you have a foreign license, you may be required to take an additional driver’s course or alcohol and drug education program prior to sitting for the driving skills test.

Get a health insurance.

Another major area to consider is health insurance for you and your family. With the onset of the new affordable healthcare act, lawfully present immigrant families are eligible buy private health insurance on the Marketplace. You may even be eligible for lower costs on monthly premiums and lower out-of-pocket costs based on your income. More information on health benefits can be found at: https://www.healthcare.gov/what-do-immigrant-families-need-to-know/.

Although transportation and health were primarily used as examples, there are other areas in which adjustments need to be made such as school systems, food, speech and mannerisms of American culture. The best way to start to tackle any of these issues is to be open-minded to trying new things and think about how you can still incorporate your own culture into this new culture. Above all else, remember the reasons why you decided to come to America in the first place and know that it may take some time for you and your family members to be fully adjusted to the American way of life, but it is a fun and exciting journey that you can all experience together.

Click here to learn more about how to move to the U.S. with ease. 

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